Intentions to quit, quit attempts, and the use of cessation aids among Malaysian adult smokers: Findings from the 2020 ITC Malaysia Survey

Citation

Kamaludin, I.S., Lim, S.H., Yee, A., Kaai, S.C., Yan, M., Danaee, M., Amer Nordin, A.S., Mohd Hairi, F., Ahmad Tajuddin, N.A., Hasan, S.I., Quah, A.C.K., Fong, G.T. (2024). Intentions to quit, quit attempts, and the use of cessation aids among Malaysian adult smokers: Findings from the 2020 ITC Malaysia Survey. Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health, [Published online Jan 10, doi: 10.1177/10105395231220465].

Abstract

This study examined quitting behavior and use of cessation aids (CAs) among Malaysian adult smokers aged ≥18 years (n = 1,047). Data were from the 2020 International Tobacco Control (ITC) Malaysia Survey were analyzed. A total of 79.9% of Malaysian smokers attempted to quit in the past 12 months and 85.2% intended to quit in the next 6 months. The most common CAs were e-cigarettes (ECs) (61.4%), medication/nicotine replacement therapies (NRTs; 51.0%), and printed materials (36.7%); the least common CA was infoline/quitline services (8.1%). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the association between sociodemographic variables and CAs use. Male smokers were more likely to use infoline/quitline services (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.27; P = .034). Malay smokers were more likely to use infoline/quitline services (aOR = 3.36; P = .002), ECs (aOR = 1.90; P = .004), printed materials (aOR = 1.79; P = .009), and in-person services (aOR = 1.75; P = .043). Most Malaysian smokers wanted to quit smoking. Furthermore, ECs were the most popular CAs, highlighting the need to assess the effectiveness of ECs for quitting smoking in Malaysia.